Keynotes


 
 
Suse Cairns
Digital Content Manager at Baltimore Museum of Art

Suse Cairns is Digital Content Manager at The Baltimore Museum of Art. During the past several years, she has been undertaking her PhD at The University of Newcastle, studying the implications of the pervasively networked information infrastructure on museums as knowledge institutions, before moving to the USA in May 2014. Cairns is author of the museumgeek blog and co-producer and host of Museopunks, a podcast for the progressive museum. She is a prolific writer, and regular presenter at conferences including Museums and the Web, the Museum Computer Network Conference, Museums Australia, and many others. When not basking in the glow of the computer screen, Cairns is probably cycling, listening to music, or looking for the latest addition to her vintage fashion collection.
http://museumgeek.wordpress.com/

Punk rock museum work
Museopunks is a podcast for the progressive museum. Every month, Jeffrey Inscho and Suse Cairns investigate the fascinating work and personalities in and around the museum sector. Since April 2013, the pair has explored some of the sector’s most stimulating questions, institutions, and practices, with a focus on emergent and boundary-pushing work and ideas. Guests have included Paola Antonelli (MoMA), Sree Sreenivasan (Metropolitan Museum of Art), Michael Edson (Smithsonian Institution), Elizabeth Merritt (Centre for the Future of Museums), Seb Chan and Aaron Cope (Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum), Nancy Proctor (Baltimore Museum of Art), John Stack (Tate), and many more. Episodes have focussed on topics such as museums in the age of scale, emergent conservation approaches for born digital and emerging media, organisational structure and strategy, and innovative curation. In April 2014, the podcast was awarded Best of the Web for Museum Professionals at Museums and the Web 2014.

Museopunks started as a way for us to learn from colleagues and have an excuse to talk to smart people about their work. This presentation will look back on slightly more than a year of Museopunks, and will ask what we've learned from making the show, and consider how museums can bring a little more punk into their work too.


 
 
Lath Carlson
Vice President of Exhibits at The Tech Museum of Innovation

Since 1991, Lath Carlson has worked with museums across the United States, bringing exceptional exhibitions over 45 million visitors. Lath is currently overseeing the total re-envisioning and transformation of the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, CA. He is also a current Noyce Leadership Institute fellow. Previously, Lath served on the faculty at Philadelphia’s University of the Arts, teaching in the schools’ Museum Exhibition, Planning and Design master’s program. He was concurrently the Vice President—Museums and Environments at Art Guild, Inc., one of the nation’s leading exhibit fabrication firms. At Art Guild, Lath worked closely with a wide range of design firms and museums to create award-winning exhibitions and engaging interactive installations.Lath’s museum career began at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico, where he designed and built exhibits while completing his degree in Cultural Anthropology. From there, his interest in interactive design and engineering led to Philadelphia, PA where he designed exhibits at the Please Touch Museum, the Children’s Museum of Philadelphia, and the Franklin Institute Science Museum.
http://www.thetech.org/

Museums 3.0- Museum as Resource
From being seen by visitors, to being used by the community.

What is the role of museums in a post internet world? How do museums stay relevant when what they once had exclusive domain over, is now broadly accessible? One path forward is provide our communities with resources they can’t get elsewhere. How can museums capitalize on their assets and become essential community resources?


 
 
Alex Freeman
Director of Special Projects, New Media Consortium

Alex Freeman is the NMC's Director of Special Projects and has seven years of experience working with art museums in a leadership capacity. He manages the NMC's Museum Initiative, which provides online training and timely research on a variety of emerging technologies being investigated and integrated by museums. Freeman is a co-author and researcher for the NMC Horizon Report series, which analyzes technology uptake across global higher education, K-12 education, and a number of other sectors and regions. Additional projects and skills include grant writing, conducting technology usability studies, event planning and hosting, and developing social media content.
http://nmc.org/

NMC Horizon Report > 2013 Museum Edition Highlights


 
 
Jeffrey Inscho
Web + Digital Media Manager, Carnegie Museum of Art

Jeffrey Inscho built his first website in the mid-90s and has been working on the web ever since. He currently leads digital and emerging media efforts at Carnegie Museum of Art, where he is responsible for developing and integrating the museum’s public-facing technology initiatives including web and mobile applications, multimedia production, and in-gallery technology deployment. In April of 2013, along with co-producer Suse Cairns, Jeffrey started Museopunks (http://museopunks.org), a monthly internet broadcast that investigates interactivity, innovation and creativity in the museum sector. He also blogs about museums, technology, mindfulness and culture at
http://staticmade.com/

Punk rock museum work
Museopunks is a podcast for the progressive museum. Every month, Jeffrey Inscho and Suse Cairns investigate the fascinating work and personalities in and around the museum sector. Since April 2013, the pair has explored some of the sector’s most stimulating questions, institutions, and practices, with a focus on emergent and boundary-pushing work and ideas. Guests have included Paola Antonelli (MoMA), Sree Sreenivasan (Metropolitan Museum of Art), Michael Edson (Smithsonian Institution), Elizabeth Merritt (Centre for the Future of Museums), Seb Chan and Aaron Cope (Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum), Nancy Proctor (Baltimore Museum of Art), John Stack (Tate), and many more. Episodes have focussed on topics such as museums in the age of scale, emergent conservation approaches for born digital and emerging media, organisational structure and strategy, and innovative curation. In April 2014, the podcast was awarded Best of the Web for Museum Professionals at Museums and the Web 2014.

Museopunks started as a way for us to learn from colleagues and have an excuse to talk to smart people about their work. This presentation will look back on slightly more than a year of Museopunks, and will ask what we've learned from making the show, and consider how museums can bring a little more punk into their work too.


 
 
Barry Joseph
Associate Director for Digital Learning at the Museum of Natural History

Barry Joseph is the Associate Director for Digital Learning at the American Museum of Natural History. Really. He sometimes has a hard time believing it himself. What an exciting time to explore the intersection of digital media and museum-based learning! In fact, his desk, on the 4th floor, is right down the hall from where the MacArthur Foundation, back in 2006, first announced its new Digital Media and Learning Initiative, whose efforts were central to Barry’s previous work as the director of Global Kids’ Online Leadership Program. But enough about him. Introduce yourself @MMMooshme or at Mooshme.org.
http://www.mooshme.org/

Murder at the Museum
In the halls of the museum education department, a murder has been committed. Bring your best investigative mindset to work with the avatar of Barry Joseph to identify what led to his demise. Be prepared to explore a wide range of innovative digital learning programs. And dust. There is always dust.


 
 
Elizabeth Merritt
Founding Director, American Alliance of Museums’ Center for the Future of Museums

As founding director of the American Alliance of Museums’ Center for the Future of Museums, Elizabeth Merritt applies the tools of strategic foresight to the nonprofit realm. She conducts trends forecasting and scenario development for museums, sharing her work through publications, social media and presentations in the US and abroad. Believing that (as CMF’s motto says) 'museums can change the world,' she is devoted to helping museums create a brighter future for their communities. Elizabeth earned has her B.S. from Yale and an M.A. in cell and molecular biology from Duke University, as well as training in futures studies at the University of Houston. She blogs for CFM at futureofmuseums.blogspot.com and tweets as @futureofmuseums.
http://www.futureofmuseums.org/

Temporal Tourism: a brief visit to 3 museums of 2030
How do we peer into the future, and what might we see? To open the conference, Elizabeth takes us on a tour of three museums in 2030, each situated within the “Cone of Plausibility” that defines potential futures, and each shaped in its own way by the trends we will explore throughout the day. First stop: the Quantified Museum, which structures itself around data gleaned from its devotees; next we drop in on the Disconnected Museum, an institution that, while relentlessly off-line, has still been shaped by the digital realm; finally we end our tour at the Distributed Museum, which has so successfully spread itself throughout in the world, using both digital and analog methods, that when disaster strikes…well, you’ll have to login to the conference to hear the end of that story.


 
 
Holly Witchey
Director of The Wade Project, Western Reserve Historical Society

Holly Witchey has a Ph.D. in European Painting and Sculpture and twenty-five years of experience as a museum professional. She is currently Director of The Wade Project at Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio. In her free time she teaches ethics and convergence issues online in the AAP Master of Arts in Museum Studies program for Johns Hopkins University, as well as traditional museum studies in the classroom, at Case Western Reserve University where she is adjunct faculty in the Department of Art History. Her research interests currently focus on North American perceptions of museums prior to the building of the nation’s first great museums in the late 19th century. Witchey has served on the board of directors for MCN and as the AAM Board-appointed member of the National Committee for Archives, Libraries, and Museums (CALM). She served as the Chair of the American Alliance of Museum’s Media and Technology Standing Professional Committee (M&T) from 2004-2007 and is currently Co-PI of the NMC Horizon Report>Museum Edition and lead blogger for MIDEA a non-profit organization with the goal to provide practical knowledge about emerging technologies that museums can use to advance their missions. From 1991-1999 she was Associate Curator of European Art and Manager of New Media at the San Diego Museum of Art, and from 2000-2009 she was Director of New Media at he Cleveland Museum of Art. Witchey is the author of 'Progressive Vision the History of Downtown Cleveland (1986),' the co-author of “The Fine Arts in Cleveland: An Illustrated History (1994), 'An Uncommon Mission' (2000), and, most recently, 'Cocktail at the Museum' an online serial set in an art museum.
http://thewadeproject.wordpress.com/about/

Intergenerosity/HELP them eat cake!
Marie Antoinette's final headache wasn't entirely the result of her inability to communicate clearly, but a hierarchical culture of ignoring the problems of the less fortunate French peasants didn’t help the situation. In our enthusiasm about the potential for new tools and technologies to change the world it is easy to lose our heads. Communication is still the key to effective collaboration. Intergenerosity is a strategy for working successfully with others to achieve goals.

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